GitHub Skyline — Your GitHub Story in 3D

Nice in-browser 3D-render of your GitHub History. You can download the result as a .stl file to run it through your 3D printer.

Here’s my 2020 timeline for example:

I take pride in the fact that my Saturdays (front row) and Sundays (back row) remain as good as empty, and that there’s an occasional gap in between the blocks where I took some time off.

GitHub Skyline →

Unfolded Studio — Geospatial Data Reinvented

A geospatial analytics platform for data unification, enrichment, and visualization.

It’s built on top of the aforementioned deck.gl and Kepler.gl

Unfolded Studio →
Unfolded Studio Example: All Public Transport stops in Germany →

Sidenote: By the looks of it, the open-source Kepler.gl is doing the heavy lifting there.

Endangered Species visualized in Pixels

Imgur user JJSmooth44 scraped The Animal Planet endangered animals list and generated photos of several animals where each “pixel” represents one actual animal running around.

The more pixelated the image, the closer it is to extinction.

There are about 2500 Bengal Tigers, so the picture above consists of 2500 “pixels”:

The Amur Leopard is less fortunate:

Every Pixel is one animal (Imgur Gallery) →

Mercator – It’s a flat, flat world!

In the 16th century, Gerardus Mercator, a Flemish cartographer devised a new way of depicting the world on a flat plane. We set off to explore his map in order to illustrate his biggest blunders, unearth curious facts and explain the advantages that make this representation of the globe still relevant today.

I especially like the fact that the several parts of the map get highlighted as you scroll, thanks to the use of ScrollMagic

Mercator – It’s a flat, flat world! →

📜 If you’d want to venture into your own “animate as you scroll” adventure, I’d recommend a more modern library such as the aforementioned Scrollama (which uses IntersectionObserver)

🗺 In case you want to see for yourself how much Mercator distorts our view of the world, go play The Mercator Puzzle. In case you’re really into projections you might want to check out the contents of my talk Geoshizzle (from a long long time ago)

🌍 If you’re new to mapping & projections, or don’t want to read the lengthy article, this video from Vox sums it up quite nicely what’s wrong with the Mercator projection:

Chart Design Guidelines at City Intelligence

At the City Intelligence unit at City Hall almost anyone can create a data visualisation. To keep everyone in line they created Data Design Guidelines:

Effective communication of evidence and data through information design and data visualisation, is obviously important to help inform policy internally, but it is also just as important to help boroughs and individual Londoners better understand their city.

With this in mind, over the past year, we have been thinking more about how we can improve the clarity, consistency and accessibility of our data visualisation output.

The guidelines, which focus principally on chart design, cover the following areas:

  • Design Principles
  • Practical Steps
  • Styling & Layout
  • Using Colour
  • Categorical Colour Palettes
  • Find & Test Your Own Colours
  • Introducing GGLAPlot
  • Chart Examples
  • Further Reading

Nice!

City Intelligence Data Design Guidelines →

Via Janne Aukia on Twitter

The Grocery Store Receipt, Reimagined

Data Visualization Engineer Susie Lu wondered: how can viz be integrated into everyday experiences?. This is what they did with the classical grocery store receipt:

Wow, that’s … great!

😔 Unfortunately we all know that stores won’t do this, as it will lead to people to be more aware of what they are spending, and thus will make them save on unnecessary spendings.

Quickly browse the history of any GitHub file with GitHistory.xyz

  1. Replace github.com with github.githistory.xyz in any file url
  2. There’s no step two

I see a good use case for education/demos this. Also love how everything flies in and out of the screen. Smooth

GitHistory.xyz →
GitHistory.xyz Source (GitHub) →

AR Experiments: Flight Paths – A visualization of flight data that floats around you.

Flight Paths is an experiment that transforms your room into a flight path visualization. Touch any horizontal surface and explore as flights take off from JFK or SFO and fly around your space.

AR Experiments: Flight Paths →

SEDAC Population Estimator

The Population Estimation Service is a Web-based service for estimating population totals and related statistics within a user-defined region. It enables users of a wide variety of map clients and tools to quickly obtain estimates of the number of people residing in specific areas without having to download and analyze large amounts of spatial data.

Tested it by drawing a (rough) polygon around Belgium and it yielded a number of nearly 12 million which is quite correct 🙂

SEDAC Population Estimation Service →
SEDAC Population Estimator Web App →