Light Years Ahead | The 1969 Apollo Guidance Computer

Half a century ago, on 20 July 1969, Neil Armstrong was in the final stages of the lunar descent, just a few thousand feet above the surface, when suddenly his on-board computer indicated a critical alarm. For three nail-biting seconds it looked as if the mission would have to be aborted. However, Armstrong was given …

SpaceX’s SN10 “Belly Flop” Composite

Earlier this week SpaceX’s SN10 rocket took off, ascended to ±10km, and then after a free fall in the horizontal position turned vertical again to successfully land (only to explode a few minutes later). While you can rewatch the whole thing online I’m more fascinated by this composite photo by Jack Beyer, visualizing the trajectory: …

Mars 2020 Entry Descent Landing

Relive the whole Mars 2020 Entry Descent Landing in your browser, in 3D, powered by Three.JS/WebGL 🤯 Here’s a few pointers to use: Use the ⏪ ⏩ at the bottom to speed up / slow down the animation Scroll over the pane on the left to jump between phases of the landing You can click …

SPACEX – ISS Docking Simulator

This simulator will familiarize you with the controls of the actual interface used by NASA Astronauts to manually pilot the SpaceX Dragon 2 vehicle to the International Space Station. Successful docking is achieved when all green numbers in the center of the interface are below 0.2. Movement in space is slow and requires patience & …

Train of SpaceX‘s Starlink Satellites captured as they fly over Holland

Yesterday SpaceX deployed the first batch of satellites for “Starlink”, its ambitious internet-from-space program. In total 60 of the 12000 planned satellites got deployed. Holland based Dr. Marco Langbroek captured the train of satellites as they passed over Leiden, the Netherlands, about 22.5 hours after launch. Over the coming days the “train” of objects will …

Not your typical map: “Where is all the poop on the moon?”

Ever wondered what the astronauts that landed on the moon did with their waste? Well, they ditched them on the moon itself. It’s been nearly 50 years since the Apollo 11 moon landing. Neil Armstrong’s iconic footprint is still there, undisturbed; there’s no atmosphere, no wind on the moon to blow it away. But the …