PngPong Image Manipulation Library

For the recent UK Elections the folks The Guardian wanted to show big images along with their push notifications. Being bandwidth-aware they wanted a solution in which they could use a template image (which could then be cached) and then draw some stuff onto it. Only problem: Service Workers don’t have access to the Canvas […]

Opera 46 and Chrome 59 now support APNG (Animated PNG)

This part of the Opera 46 release notes got me very excited: Opera now supports animated PNG, or APNG for short. APNG is a file format that works similarly to GIF. The difference is that APNG is smaller and supports both 24-bit images and 8-bit transparency. Ever since APNG landed in Firefox (10 years ago […]

Easily manipulate images in PHP with spatie/image

Great new package by the folks at Spatie to working with images in PHP, powered by Glide. Glide itself is great, but uses an URL based approach (which has its benefits); yet in most cases I find myself using a code based approach. This is where spatie/image comes into play: spatie/image wraps up Glide so […]

Saving bandwidth through machine learning

When requesting a high-resolution image with the Android Google+ app, one no longer gets the full version sent over. Instead, one gets a low-resolution version which is then processed by RAISR: RAISR, which was introduced in November, uses machine learning to produce great quality versions of low-resolution images, allowing you to see beautiful photos as […]

Grade.js

This JavaScript library produces complementary gradients generated from the top 2 dominant colours in supplied images. Apply the Grade function to elements wrapping the source images: <script src="path/to/grade.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> window.addEventListener('load', function(){ Grade(document.querySelectorAll('.gradient-wrap')) }) </script> … <div class="gradient-wrap"> <img src="./samples/finding-dory.jpg" alt="" /> </div> Installation possible with npm: npm install grade-js Grade.js →Grade Source (GitHub) →

Image diffing using PHP

PHP package by Undemanding to calculate how much difference (in percent) there is between two images: use Undemanding\Difference\Image; use Undemanding\Difference\Method\EuclideanDistance; $image1 = new Image("/path/to/image1.png"); $image2 = new Image("/path/to/image2.png"); $difference = $image1->difference($image2, new EuclideanDistance()); $boundary = $difference->boundary(); // → ["left" => …, "top" => …] $percentage = $difference->percentage(); // → 14.03… Undemanding Difference → Did you […]

Styling Broken Images

Turns out it’s possible to style broken images. You know, from this: To this: But just “how”, one might ask? Because the <img> element is a replaced element controlled by an external source, the :before and :after pseudo-elements typically shouldn’t work with it. However, when the image is broken and not loaded, these pseudo-elements can […]

Tools for image optimization

Where possible, it’s best to try automating image optimization so that it’s a first-class citizen in your build chain. To help, I thought I’d share some of the tools I use for this. Not only contains a list of grunt plugins one can use, but also a few command line and online tools. I’ve been […]

WebKit now supports srcset image attribute

<img src="image-src.png" srcset="image-1x.png 1x, image-2x.png 2x" alt="Example of the srcset attribute. Image contains a coloured striped pattern with some inline text that indicates which of the candidate images were selected."> WebKit now supports the srcset attribute on image (img) elements. This allows you, the developer, to specify higher-quality images for your users who have high-resolution […]