Side-channel attacking browsers through CSS3 features

Ruslan Habalov and Dario Weißer found a way to read contents from an iframe, using CSS3: Accessing the DOM of an iframe that includes a cross-origin resource is forbidden by default. However, the content of the iframe was displayed in the same context as the rest of the site so we wanted to verify if […]

Reverse clip path with blend modes

Nice example on applying an SVG-defined clipPath using CSS. Note that’s it no simple triangle in the example, but a triangle with an inner triangle cut out, created using the reverse clip path approach by Ana Tudor. The gif and the extra background-blend-mode: screen; also give it a nice touch πŸ™‚ Reverse clip path with […]

Compositing And Blending In CSS

Before the Compositing and Blending specification was introduced, CSS allowed one type of composite operations: simple alpha compositing. This is what the opacity property is for. By changing an element’s opacity, the browser makes it translucent so that the colors of its backdrop can show through. Today, two main properties exist that allow us to […]

Making the Web Sweeter with Food Network and Cupcakes

Adobe’s Web Platform group teamed up with Food Network to experiment with bringing their popular Cupcakes! tablet application to the web. See how we turned beautiful content from Food Network, hardware from Leap Motion, speech recognition, responsive tooling, and new layout and graphics standards into a next-generation web experience. Canvas Blend Modes, CSS Masks, CSS […]

Photoshop Blend Modes coming to CSS

If you’re a user of our design applications such as Photoshop and Illustrator, you know how you can create very cool effects with blend modes. Last year, I joined the W3C and started contributing to the SVG and FX task forces. I am now spending the bulk of my time on editing, discussing and implementing […]

Photoshop-style blend modes for HTML Canvas Contexts

Adobe Photoshop has a variety of helpful blend modes for compositing images from multiple RGBA layers. This small library provides the same functionality for HTML Canvas Contexts, with the goal of producing the same results as Photoshop. Allows you to do stuff like: // Likely an ‘offscreen’ (not in the DOM) canvas var over = […]