Prevent Layout Shifts between Web Fonts and Fallback Fonts with the size-adjust @font-face descriptor

You know something good’s landed when two out of the three great Web/CSS resources — here Smashing Magazine and web.dev (*) — write about the same topic: the size-adjust descriptor for @font-face. To improve font rendering, a great technique is font swapping. The problem however, is that sometimes when the web font loads, it shifts …

google-webfonts-helper — A Hassle-Free Way to Self-Host Google Fonts

To self-host Webfonts from Google Fonts — which you should — there’s google-webfonts-helper which you can use. They offer the entire Google Fonts catalog and provide a way to easily download the fonts and accompanying CSS snippets you need. google-webfonts-helper → Via Sebastian

CC Symbols – A webfont with Unicode-compatible Creative Commons license symbols

New in Unicode 13 is the addition of the Creative Commons License symbols (along with 5382 other characters): U+0229C No derivatives U+1F16D Creative Commons U+1F16E Public Domain U+1F16F Attribution U+1F10D No rights reserved U+1F10E Share-alike U+1F10F Non-commercial Daniel Aleksandersen was quite excited to use these on his site, but then noticed: No system fonts — font files …

A Variable Fonts Primer

Now that Google Fonts has some Variable Fonts in their offering, this primer on Variable Fonts might come in handy: Variable fonts let you add nuance and artistry to your web typography without bogging down your site. Now you can accomplish what used to require several files with a single file and some CSS! The …

Should you self-host Google Fonts?

Google Fonts is great, but it also has a downside: it affects your page’s waterfall (during which some render-blocking may occur, as it involves CSS) as explained by Barry Pollard: The problem is that your website (say www.example.com) loads the stylesheet from fonts.googleapis.com, which returns some CSS made up of font-face declarations. This means you …

Control Google Fonts font loading with font-display

As of late May Google Fonts has added support for a display querystring parameter. Using it you can control the CSS font-display Property which allows you to control what happens while the font is unavailable. Specifying https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto&display=swap as the font to load, will yield the following: @font-face { font-family: 'Roboto'; font-style: normal; font-weight: 400; font-display: …

How to use variable fonts in the real world

Richard Rutter (@clagnut): Using variable fonts in the real world turns out to be tricky. This post explains how we achieved it for the new Ampersand website and what we learned along the way. Always great to see how others went head first into a problem. Be sure to checkout the Ampersand website itself too, …

Fontastic Web Performance

Emojineer Monica Dinculescu: Web fonts are awesome. They make your sans-serifs slabby, your headers special and your website look gorgeous. But fonts are a resource, and downloading resources always comes as a cost — if you don’t load web fonts efficiently, what you get instead are phantom underlines, blank pages, and user rage. Let’s talk …

What do Variable Fonts mean for Web Developers?

Variable Fonts are still in active development […] in this article I’ll focus on what they mean for web developers, and how you can try them out today ahead of time. Next to changes to font-weight (which will allow increments of 1), you also have fine control over a variable font its variations – see …