Sesame Street: Star S’Mores (Star Wars Parody)

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cPanel mass delete forwarders

One of the things I miss in cPanel is a way to mass delete forwarders. With the current version of cPanel you need to click the delete link next to each forwarder. Above that you don’t actually delete that forwarder upon clicking, you are taken to a confirm page where you need to click “confirm” in order to actually delete it. Deleting 100 entries can therefore take up quite a lot of time.

To speed things up I’ve knocked up a little JavaScript which:

  1. Replaces all URLs that link to such a confirm page to link to the actual delete page.
  2. Opens up all those links one by one so that the e-mailaddresses actually get deleted.

Usage would be something like this:

  1. In cPanel, go to Forwarders
  2. Use the “search” field to limit the results shown.
  3. Run the script above in the Dev Tools. All addresses shown from the previous step will be deleted.

(You might need to allow popups in your browser for your cPanel URL though)

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Storing MD5 values

A common occurrence I have noticed in MySQL apps is that MD5 values are stored as 32 byte values rather than 16. Just to ‘rehash’, an MD5 value is a 16 byte hexadecimal value, typically used as a unique fixed-length signature of a string, useful for identifying unique strings or one-way encryption of passwords. The binary representation takes 16 bytes (e.g. BINARY(16)), though a human readable hexadecimal version takes twice as many (e.g. CHAR(32)).

Same goes for IPv4 address, which can be stored as UNSIGNED INT (4 bytes) instead of VARCHAR(16) (16 bytes)

Tip: Storing MD5 values →

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OMOTE / REAL-TIME FACE TRACKING & PROJECTION MAPPING

Wow!

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heatmap.js

heatmapjs
var heatmap = h337.create({
  container: domElement
});

heatmap.setData({
  max: 5,
  data: [{ x: 10, y: 15, value: 5}, ...]
});

A Google Maps plugin is also available

heatmap.js – Dynamic Heatmaps for the Web →
Gmaps Heatmap Layer Plugin →

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Feastdance / A Feast with Dragons / A Dance for Crows

feastdance

Are you reading A Song of Ice and Fire for the first time? Have you heard that volumes four and five – A Feast for Crows and A Dance with Dragons – cover the same time period but split up the characters, so that most of the people who appear in Feast don’t show up in Dance and vice versa? Are you interested in recombining the two halves of the story in hopes that it’ll make for a more satisfying reading experience? Here’s how you do it!

A new reader–friendly combined reading order for A Feast for Crows & A Dance with Dragons →

(Hat tip, Michel)

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Apple Developer: Common App Rejections

app-rejections

Before you develop your app, it’s important to become familiar with the technical, content, and design criteria that we use to review all apps. We’ve highlighted some of the most common issues that cause apps to get rejected to help you better prepare your apps before submitting them for review.

58% of all rejections are linked to only 10 reasons.

Apple Developer: Common App Rejections &rarr

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Cards

BuyNow

A definition of a card (on the web) by Khoi Vinh:

A card is a single unit of content or functionality, presented in a concise visual package. More advanced cards use that form to surface content or functionality from other apps, and allow users to interact with that content or functionality directly in the context of where a user encounters the card.

Think embeddable tweets for example. Speaking of: those Twitter Cards just got taken to the next level as it’s now possible to make a purchase directly from within the card (pictured above)!

What is a card? →

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ROYGBIV: A Pixar Supercut

A one minute supercut examining (and celebrating) Pixar’s use of color.

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Betteridge’s law of headlines

A term to remember:

Betteridge’s law of headlines is an adage that states: “Any headline which ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.”

Betteridge’s law of headlines →

(via )

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