Princesses make terrible passwords

From the Firefox Blog:

When the Disney+ streaming service rolled out, millions of people flocked to set up accounts. And within a week, thousands of poor unfortunate souls reported that their Disney passwords were hacked. According to media reports, some Disney+ account holders have lost their account access while hackers have sold their logins online.

Turns out a lot of people used one of Disney’s characters their name as their password, which is not the brightest idea.

Princesses make terrible passwords →

Aladdin Trailer

Disney’s Aladdin (1992) is getting a live-action remake. Today the trailer got released:

I was 9 when the original Aladdin came out. I can sing along to all of its songs by heart. So yeah, I’m quite the sucker for this re-make. The trailer looks quite promising so I’m starting to think that they won’t have f*cked it up too much (unlike what they did with that Beauty and the Beast remake).

Augmented Reality Coloring Book

In this paper, we present an augmented reality coloring book App in which children color characters in a printed coloring book and inspect their work using a mobile device. The drawing is detected and tracked, and the video stream is augmented with an animated 3-D version of the character that is textured according to the child’s coloring.

My kids would love this.

Disney Research: Live Texturing of Augmented Reality Characters from Colored Drawings →

Find Your Way to Oz

“Find Your Way to Oz” is a new Google Chrome Experiment brought to the web by Disney. It allows you to take an interactive journey through a Kansas circus, which leads you to the land of Oz after you are swept up by a massive storm.

Find Your Way to Oz →
“Find Your Way to Oz” Technical Info →

Disney’s “Glow with the Show”

Disney has added a spectacular new element to its World of Color light show at the Disney California Adventure Park, equipping audience members with LED Mickey Mouse ears controlled remotely via infrared (IR). According to an explanatory video posted by Disney, the ears communicate with IR controllers grouped into spatial zones, allowing technicians to perform actions such as sweeping changes of color.

Reminds me of Seb’s Pixelphones

(via The Verge)