The Opinionated Guide to React

Sara Vieira (@NikkitaFTW) published her book “The Opinionated Guide to React”. It’s 190 pages of React Recipes and Code Examples.

This book is my personal map of the tips, power-ups and not-so-obvious solutions to common questions and problems that I’ve come across during 4 years of React development. I have been finding some of the cheat codes and share them with you.

Even though I’m a seasoned React Developer, I’ve bought the book as:

  1. It’s quite a steal at $30
  2. It’s how you can support other devs

It was a pleasure to see many of the approaches I take – and teach about in my workshop React from Scratch – get confirmed in the book.

The Opinionated Guide to React →

Tackling TypeScript: Upgrading from JavaScript

New book on TypeScript by Dr. Axel Rauschmayer, who also wrote Exploring ES6 (and a few other books on JavaScript).

This book consists of two parts:

  • Part 1 is a quick start for TypeScript that teaches you the essentials quickly.
  • Part 2 digs deeper into the language and covers many important topics in detail.

This book is not a reference, it is meant to complement the official TypeScript handbook.

The first part is freely available.

Tackling TypeScript: Upgrading from JavaScript →

Symfony 5: The Fast Track

Symfony 5 recently got released. Fabien Potencier – Symfony’s creator – has also published a book along with its release.

This book – written by Symfony’s creator – lays out a pragmatic approach to developing web applications with Symfony 5: from scratch to production. Whether you are discovering Symfony for the first time or refreshing your knowledge, this practical guide provides the definitive introduction to modern Symfony applications.

Symfony 5: The Fast Track →

The Lean Web

Free book by Chris Fernandi:

The web is a bloated, over-engineered mess. And, I believe many of our modern “best practices” are actually making the web worse.

In this book, I want to share some ideas on how to fix it, and explore a new set of best practices to replace what we do today.

(The alternate title for this book is “Old man yells at cloud.”)

/me nods along

If you want, you can also watch a recording of a talk by Chris covering the same contents:

The Lean Web →

As mentioned before, here’s a related quote by Derek Featherstone:

In the web front-end stack — HTML, CSS, JS, and ARIA — if you can solve a problem with a simpler solution lower in the stack, you should. It’s less fragile, more foolproof, and just works.

Resilient Management, an excerpt

On A List Apart you can read an excerpt from the book Resilient Management by Lara Hogan. It’s from chapter 2, entitled “Grow your teammates”:

To spur this course-correction and growth in your teammates, you’ll end up wearing four different hats:

  • Mentoring: lending advice and helping to problem solve based on your own experience.
  • Coaching: asking open questions to help your teammate reflect and introspect, rather than sharing your own opinions or quickly problem solving.
  • Sponsoring: finding opportunities for your teammate to level up, take on new leadership roles, and get promoted.
  • Delivering feedback: observing behavior that is or isn’t aligned to what the team needs to be doing and sharing those observations, along with praise or suggestions.

Let’s dive in to how to choose, and when to use, each of these skills as you grow your teammates, and then talk about what it looks like when teammates support the overarching direction of the team.

/me orders book.

Resilient Management, an excerpt →

Front-end Style Guides – Creating and Maintaining Style Guides for Websites

Anna Debbenham – creator of styleguides.io – wrote a book on … Style Guides:

Designers and developers have taken different approaches to putting together their own web-based style guides. This book highlights the various techniques and the projects that have used them. It’s packed with practical tips, whether you’re starting from scratch or assembling one for an existing site.

This book is for people who build stuff for the web and want to make their own style guides. It’s full of techniques, practical advice and examples for both coders and non-coders.

It’s in my library, waiting to read 🙂

Front-end Style Guides →

Resilient Web Design

Jeremy Keith wrote a book, “Resilient Web Design”, on how to build a web that lasts:

With a title like Resilient Web Design, you might think that this is a handbook for designing robust websites. This is not a handbook. It’s more like a history book.

[…]

You won’t find any code in here to help you build better websites. But you will find ideas and approaches. Ideas are more resilient than code.

Jeremy’s writing style – just like his style of speaking – is very inspiring and packed with lots of relevant backstory.

Resilient Web Design, by Jeremy Keith →