The most feared song in jazz, explained

I sometimes like to rewatch pieces from the Vox Earworm and Vox Borders video series. I especially liked this one on John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” from the Vox Earworm series, for which they won the Emmy for “Outstanding New Approaches: Arts, Lifestyle and Culture”: John Coltrane, one of jazz history’s most revered saxophonists, released “Giant […]

Why new diseases keep appearing in China

Again a very interesting video by Vox, especially in these COVID-19/Corona times: why is it that this new disease emerged from China and not from another country? As of early March 2020, a new coronavirus, called COVID-19, is in more than 70 countries and has killed more than 3,100 people, the vast majority in China. […]

How ads follow you around the internet

A video-version of How tracking pixels work by Vox: In this video, we explain how cookies work and what you should know about how they’re being used. And we get a little help from the man who invented them. Spot on “Finding Dory” analogy. One thing where they do go off a bit is that […]

Bach’s G major prelude, deconstructed

Another great entry in the Vox Earworm series: Bach’s six cello suites are considered a rite of passage for cellists. They’re masterpieces of classical music, and the prelude in G major — the first movement of the suites — is perhaps the best example of Bach’s power as a composer. In it, he’s able to […]

The ingredients of a classic house track

Another great video in the Vox Earworm series, a must see for any (house) music lover. Perfect fit to watch right after their previous “The Disco Invention that Changed Pop Music” video. On June 12, 1979, thousands of disco records were destroyed at Chicago’s “Disco Demolition Night”. Within one year, Chicago DJs and producers had […]

Why the Soviets doctored this iconic photo

With the recent 75 year remembrance of the Normandy Landings (D-Day), I was reminded of this video by Vox, from the Vox Darkroom series: “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” and “Raising a Flag over the Reichstag” are similarly iconic photos from World War II. They’re both beloved images of victory, and they’re both taken […]

It’s not you. Phones are designed to be addicting.

Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. But that’s kind of the point. I never understood why people would want to get notifications for every cough and sneeze. Turn ‘m […]