The Basecamp Guide to Internal Communication

From the folks at Basecamp, a guide on how/when/why they use chat/face-to-face/e-mail/… when communicating.

Below you’ll find a collection of general principles we try to keep in mind at Basecamp when communicating with teammates, within departments, across the company, and with the public. They aren’t requirements, but they serve to create boundaries and shared practices to draw upon when we do the one thing that affects everything else we do: communicate.

Ooh I like that list they’ve included. Totally rhymes with thoughts I had shared before:

The Basecamp Guide to Internal Communication →

Via Jeremy

Wire – Modern communication. Full privacy.

Wire is a modern, private communications tool offering free text, voice, video, pictures, and much more. Wire is available on iOS, Android and desktop. Wire conversations are end-to-end encrypted, ensuring all data is private and secure.

There are no ads, banners, popups, takeovers β€” none of that. Wire does not sell your usage data to advertising companies. Created by some of the key people behind Skype, Wire seeks to harness the demand for an independent ad-free messaging platform, and serve as the future of digital communications.

The source for their webapp, iOS app, Android App, etc. are all available on GitHub.

Wire →
Wire repositories on GitHub →

How E.T. Really Phoned Home

The communication device E.T built to phone home? Totally legit, as described in an article in the April 1983 edition of β€œ73 Magazine” (an amateur radio magazine):

If it were not for an inventive ham, E. T. might still be trying. In this exclusive article, the designer of the little guy’s communicator unveils its inner workings.

Always great to hear/see if a technology used in a movie is factually correct, unlike things like CSI’s zoom and enhance for example.

How E.T. Really Called Home (PDF) →

Feel Me

At a first glance Feel Me appears as a text messaging application. Yet, when the two parts are both looking at the conversation they are having, touches on the screen of one side are shown on the other side as small dots.
Touching the same spot triggers a small reaction, such as a vibration or a sound, acknowledging that both parts are *there* at the same time.

Feel Me →

(via jnack)