How To Crash An Airplane

A talk by Nickolas Means, as recorded at Fronteers 2018 (which I attended).

On July 19, 1989, United Airlines Flight 232 was en route to Chicago when a mechanical failure caused the plane to become all but uncontrollable. In this unsurvivable situation, the flight crew saved more than half of those onboard. How did they do it?

Flight crews and software teams have a lot in common, and there’s much we can learn from how the best crews do their jobs. What can we learn from the story of United 232? While this talk won’t earn you your pilot’s license, you’ll definitely come away with some fresh ideas on how to make your team even more amazing.

If the audio is bothering you (there seems to be a bit of an audio loop in there?), there’s this rendition from 2016 that you might enjoy instead:

How We Built the World Wide Web in Five Days

At the most recent edition of Fronteers Conference – a conference which I’ve been attending for over 10 yeras by now – Jeremy Keith & Remy Sharp did a two-person talk on their rebuild of the original WorldWideWeb application back in February.

Join (Je)Remy on a journey through time and space and code as they excavate the foundations of Tim Berners-Lee’s gloriously ambitious and hacky hypertext system that went on to conquer the world.

I really liked this talk. The two-person format worked remarkably well.

ESNext: Proposals to look forward to (Fronteers Jam Session)

At last years’ edition of Fronteers Conference I gave a lightning talk on ESNext, covering the TC39 Process and highlighting three of my favorite proposals (some of which have hit Stage-3 by now!). Earlier this week they released the video of my (short) talk

The lightning talk itself was a short version of a full talk ESNext: Proposals to look forward to which I’ve already given a few times by now.

👋 If you’re attending this years’ edition of Fronteers and want to have a chat, don’t hesitate to talk to me when you see me.

Front-End Performance: The Dark Side @ Fronteers Spring Conference 2016

facebook-timing-attack

Video of the talk “Front-End Performance: The Dark Side” by Mathias Bynens which he gave at Fronteers Spring Conference 2016 which I attended:

In security-sensitive situations, performance can actually be a bug rather than a feature. This presentation covers timing attacks on the web, and demonstrates how modern performance-related web APIs can sometimes have a negative security impact.

The slides themselves are also available:

The mentioned Facebook timing attack – by which you can get to know private data (such as age, gender, etc.) of a user – was discovered by Tom Van Goethem, a former student of mine. Feel free to read his academic paper “The Clock is Still Ticking: Timing Attacks in the Modern Web” covering the topic.

JavaScript Roots: Core Language Essentials

(That’s a presentation embedded above. Use your left/right arrow keys to navigate through it. You might need to click it first in order to focus it.)

Whilst we, JavaScript developers, are nowadays spoiled with tools, frameworks, build systems, etc. we might tend to forget some of the core things contained in the JavaScript language.

Think of some core language things such as variables, variable types, functions, closures, IIFEs, etc. — these are all things that one should know as they can explain some of the — at first — odd looking behavior JavaScript has.

Yesterday, at a #fronteersbe meetup, I gave a talk just about that. The presentation is embedded above.