Designers will design, developers will develop, and why you must stop them

derailed

Leonard Teo, CEO of ArtStation, on how he almost killed the project before – eventually – successfully launching it:

We were far behind schedule with a product I had allowed to become too complex. Whenever I needed a change that should have taken 5 minutes, it took days or even weeks.

[…]

I had allowed the developers to dictate to me the “best practices” and I had allowed them to go their merry way, which meant many sprints iterating on perfecting the architecture but not actually shipping the product. I failed to communicate the real business and time constraints and acquiesced to their push back, wanting to create beautiful code.

At work I sometimes question why we are about to do a project using a specific technology. It’s not because some technology is the new kid on the block, that we need to use said technology (although we might). Don’t get me wrong: it’s not about taking shortcuts, it’s about keeping things simple as – sometimes – something simple will really do. KISS & YAGNI & MSP & (in due time, if need be) git commit -am 'Refactoring'.

Designers will design, developers will develop, and why you must stop them →

How quitting my corporate job for my startup dream f*cked my life up

Doing a startup was a long journey and I was putting myself under so much pressure by giving such a f*ck about what other people think.

Day by day, I was getting lonelier and more depressive as I avoided social occasions. My startup progress was not as fast as my social circle imagined it to be and I was fed up with telling people it took years for startups like Facebook and Twitter to arrive at where they are now.

There are five things I wish I had asked myself before starting this painful journey. Five questions I believe every future entrepreneur should ask himself before taking the first step to entrepreneurship

It’s not all candy an puppies in startup-land.

How quitting my corporate job for my startup dream f*cked my life up →

Startup lessons from a crime boss

Interesting things happen when we cut out the middleman. In addition to reducing cost, we often end up creating an internal byproduct that can be productized and sold to a completely new customer. (Amazon Web Services is an example of this.) Sometimes the middleman’s market is so huge, that a freaking enormous business can be built simply by providing their customers a lower cost and more efficient option.

Everything I need to know about startups, I learned from a crime boss →

(via kottke)